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Naomi


The Beautiful Game..

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For Max's birthday on Thursday Max and I went to the Thai/Malaysian/Chinese/Singaporean restaurant called Hawker's Delight. It's a little place in Hendon with the kitchen at the front window and no liquor license. It's one of our favorite places to eat, and doing this kind of small outing is one thing we miss the most about being together. The woman who always remembers us wasn't there that night, which was a little disappointing. I hadn't been there for 10 months this time so I wanted to test her memory skills again. Max went to the store next door and bought four beers which we enjoyed with our meal (I had Pad Thai, Max had Pad Ped.) After dinner we walked to one of our local pubs, The Bodhran, for a few pints. It's not a fantastic pub, but it's decent for a local.

We had tickets to see a musical called The Beautiful Game that Max's parents gave us. We took the tube to the center of London and had a quick sandwich in Neal's Yard (we were going to go to the "Soup Opera" but they were closed) and then walked to the Cambridge Theatre. I had hadn't heard much about the play, but this quote explains it well:

Ben Elton, who wrote the book and lyrics, explains the story: "Set in Belfast mainly between 1969 and 1972, it concerns the fortunes of a group of young men and women centered around a local youth football team - these young people have the misfortune to come of age at the beginning of a time of terrible trouble in Northern Ireland and the drama follows their efforts to live their lives against a backdrop of ever increasing sectarian division and violence. Some of the characters are drawn into the conflict, others stand aside wanting only to be allowed to get on with their lives in peace. "Although this is an Irish story, taking place in Belfast, I hope that the themes and sentiments of The Beautiful Game are universal. All over the world communities are challenged by violence and hatred. This musical is dedicated to all those innocent and defenceless people who every day are forced to struggle simply to be left alone. Simply to be allowed to live and to love in peace."

We had fantastic seats that were only six rows from the front. When it began I was a little wary as to whether it would hold my interest or not, but I was hooked quickly. The story, music, and acting were superb and it was both very funny and tragic (yes, I cried.) If any of you ever have the chance to see it, seize the opportunity.


[click photo to enlarge]
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On March 27th, 2001 04:31 am (UTC), nomi replied:
What a cute lj icon!

I saw Phantom of the Opera when I was 12, but this was a lot more interesting to me. I like the escapism of a fairytale, but this was refreshingly down to earth and real.
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On March 26th, 2001 11:27 am (UTC), gael commented:
Lol - "Soup Opera" - I love the name!

"Beautiful Game" sounds intriguing. I just love live theatre! I can thoroughly enjoy a musical when it's live, but I can barely sit through one if it's on TV. There's a dynamism that comes through when you're in a live audience that just doesn't come through for me when it's recorded.

You sound so happy. Makes me smile. :-D

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On March 27th, 2001 04:36 am (UTC), nomi replied:
Hehe I like it too. Apparently they have dozens of soup varieties. Max keeps talking about it so I had hoped to check it out. Next time!

I love live theatre too. The two main women were fairly petite, but they could sure belt out the songs. They had amazingly strong voices. It certainly has a stronger effect of someone screaming and crying right in front of you too. You feel like you're witnessing something that you shouldn't really be seeing. There was also a love scene and I felt like I should avert my eyes. ;)
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